An oral history of the many ways technology is changing the way we buy, sell, play, communicate...and live.

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Watch "BuzzFeed Brews with Jerry Seinfeld" on YouTube

BuzzFeed Brews with Jerry Seinfeld:

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iOS 2014 = Android 2009.

iOS 2014 = Android 2009.

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Watch "Violinist, Lindsey Stirling" on YouTube

Violinist, Lindsey Stirling:

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“We need to start thinking about marketing in a digital world, a world gone digital. We think too much about digital marketing, which is applying thinking we have learnt to marketing digitally, as opposed to marketing in a digital world in which people will eventually get rid of banner ads. I don’t see them and I guess most people will find a way to eliminate them. It’s a lot about embracing this multitude of sources of relevance of message otherwise people will just get rid of it,” he adds. His comments come as new research from YouTube and TNS unveiled at Cannes shows that digital branded content is now having an impact “all the way down the funnel”, not just in awareness but also in purchasing behaviour. The study found that to tap into this, brands need to be creating content that has purpose and focuses on the experience, with brands such as Dove, Evian and Procter & Gamble showcasing how to build brands in the digital world.

http://www.marketingweek.co.uk/sectors/fmcg/news/unilevers-marc-mathieu-people-think-too-much-about-digital-marketing/4010840.article (via technologycreativityadvertising)

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Inamoto said he identified three key aspects that winning campaigns needed to achieve: 1. Keep it simple. Inamoto said an idea that’s too complex to understand quickly will rarely gain traction in a social media world with little patience. 2. Potential for scale. Inamoto believes too many high-profile creative ideas are practically fictional when you look at what it would take to implement them on any sort of large scale. “We questioned some of these ideas: ‘Is this really possible?’ We’re not trying to make a sci-fi story here. We want something that can be executed in a reasonable amount of time in the near future.” 3. Create a contribution to the business and the world. Today’s best marketing ideas have clear benefit for the client but also clear benefits for the world or society.  One of Inamoto’s favorite picks in this year’s Future Lions was “Do Zero For Climate Change for Ben & Jerry’s”, which he said is a perfect example of a client-oriented project that could have a lasting impact on the environment.  “I just love the fact that even students can tackle, on behalf of a brand, a problem so large it affects literally every human being on the planet.”

http://www.adweek.com/news/advertising-branding/3-secrets-being-next-great-creative-cannes-158403

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Watch "#VAMOSLEO - Leo Messi at the 2014 FIFA World Cup™…" on YouTube

#VAMOSLEO - Leo Messi at the 2014 FIFA World Cup™…:

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For Brewer, containers are all about creating a world where developers can just build software, where they don’t have to think about the infrastructure needed to run that software. This, he says, is how cloud computing will continue to evolve. Developers will worry less about the thousands of machines needed to run their application and more about the design of the application itself. “The container is more of an application-level view of what you’re doing, versus a machine-level view,” he says, “and it’s pretty clear that the application view is more natural and will win in the longterm.”

http://www.wired.com/2014/06/eric-brewer-google-docker/

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Some have recently criticized Apple for not being Googly enough, arguing that Google is making big, bold bets like self-driving cars, while Apple sticks to its narrow focus on consumer electronics. This is a mostly silly argument: Apple is only Apple because of this focus, and there’s no real reason for two different companies to behave the same, anyway.

http://qz.com/217406/the-apple-doesnt-get-the-cloud-era-is-officially-over/

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The new law of apps demands that every startup should be all things to all people.

Tinder Improves on Snapchat By Giving You 24 Hours to Screenshot a Pic

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(via Here’s the entire Internet live, in one real-time infographic | VentureBeat | OffBeat | by John Koetsier)

(via Here’s the entire Internet live, in one real-time infographic | VentureBeat | OffBeat | by John Koetsier)

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The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s preliminary statement of policy about autonomous vehicles is gung ho, to put it mildly.

"Although this Statement focuses on the enormous safety potential of these new technologies, they offer an even wider range of possible benefits. Vehicle control systems that automatically accelerate and brake with the flow of traffic can conserve fuel more efficiently than the average driver. By eliminating a large number of vehicle crashes, highly effective crash avoidance technologies can reduce fuel consumption by also eliminating the traffic congestion that crashes cause every day on our roads. Reductions in fuel consumption, of course, yield corresponding reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. To the extent vehicles can communicate with each other and with the highway infrastructure, the potential for safer and more efficient driving will be increased even more. Drivers—or vehicles themselves—will be able to make more intelligent route selections based on weather and traffic data received by the vehicle in real time. Mobility for those with a range of disabilities will be greatly enhanced if the basic driving functions can be safely performed by the vehicle itself, opening new windows for millions of people."

www.nhtsa.gov/staticfiles/rulemaking/pdf/automated_vehicles_policy.pdf?c=ffd8be50-cc28-44ab-bb2a-5b0a48516802

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Even the handsets themselves are trickling up. That Alacatel handset is going to bring an Android-powered smartphone to U.S. consumers for just $80, with no contract. (And the T-Mobile pay-as-you-go plans cost about what you’d spend on a feature phone plan.) Another Alcatel smartphone, the OneTouch Evolve, retails for just $59–and it’s a 3G model. Both are based on a platform from MediaTek, a Taiwanese giant you’ve never heard of. It makes white label handsets that operators can customize for local markets. The Fierce is based on MediaTek’s MT6589 platform, and the Evolve is MT6575.

Thanks to a huge market in the developing world, the three out of ten American consumers who couldn’t previously afford a smartphone may be able to buy one this year (and next year, and the year after). These are phones for the unexotic underclass. These are phones for everyone who has broken a smartphone eight months into a contract. These are phones for traveling (dual SIM!), for adventures, for everything you want to do and document and stay in touch while doing it but are too afraid to take your new iPhone along.

It’s gotten easy to get blasé about high end flagships. The processors, cameras, screens, and, increasingly, the apps are all very, very good. We’ve reached the point of incremental improvements. They have parity. You basically know what’s coming, year after year.

But these cheap, fast, out of control handsets are something else entirely. Something new. Something different. Something we can’t really predict. And that’s really exciting.

Don’t Diss Cheap Smartphones. They’re About to Change Everything | Gadget Lab | WIRED

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These app constellations are possibly the only sustainable answer to solving the distribution conundrum in mobile – how do I get around the app store leaderboard traffic jam? If you own a leading constellation, you can use your apps and your relationship with the users of those apps to promote and distribute new apps that you either build or buy. This promotion is “in situ” right on the mobile phone where the consumer’s attention is increasingly placed. I see this as yet another “rich get richer” dynamic in the mobile ecosystem.

It is interesting to contrast all of this to what happened in the last downloadable software phase in tech – PCs and PC Software. In that world, Microsoft’s Windows OS became totally dominant and led to a dominant application monopoly (Outlook, Excel, Word, Powerpoint, etc). In native mobile, we have a duopoly with iOS and Android and what looks like at least six App Constellations (Google, Apple, Facebook, Twitter, Yahoo!, Dropbox). There may be some other important constellations emerging. I would love some suggestions of other ones in the comments (Foursquare?).

App Constellations – AVC

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Foursquare’s Swarm And The Rise Of The Invisible App | TechCrunch

There’s a fundamental shift in the way that we use apps underway, and the symptoms are all over the map. From a deeper, more thoughtful approach to push notifications to the breaking apart of large, unwieldy apps into smaller more focused components.

The shift we’re seeing will be the third strata of user interaction since the iPhone popularized the mobile app in a major way. The initial offerings for the iPhone and then Android devices adhered fairly closely to the ‘information appliance’ model. Using software, you transformed your phone into a mostly mono-purpose device just like it said on the tin. Now it’s a phone. Now it’s a calculator. Now it’s a messaging tool.

The second phase is the ‘home screen’ era, where every app fought hard to be your home base. The prevailing wisdom was that you had to cram everything your service offered into mobile, using a form of design-driven gavage to stuff your app until it was positively groaning with tabs and gutters and drawers.

Now, we’re entering the age of apps as service layers. These are apps you have on your phone but only open when you know they explicitly have something to say to you. They aren’t for ‘idle browsing’, they’re purpose built and informed by contextual signals like hardware sensors, location, history of use and predictive computation.

These ‘invisible apps’ are less about the way they look or how many features they cram in and more about maximizing their usefulness to you without monopolizing your attention.

What happens when a social network knows exactly what posts you’ll want to read and tells you when you can see them, and not before? What about a shopping app that ignores everything that you’re unlikely to buy and taps you on the shoulder for only the most killer of deals? What about a location aware app that knows where you and all of your friends are at all times but is smart enough to know when you want people to know and when you don’t?

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